Sonia Rollins
EXIT Premier Real Estate | 781-454-6043 | [email protected]


Posted by Sonia Rollins on 8/9/2020


 Picture by PIRO4D via Pixabay

Flooring can add to the function of your newly finished basement, or it can take it away. Installing the wrong type of flooring material in a below-grade space could leave you open to costly water damage or even the growth of mold and bacteria. Even the best-built basements are sometimes prone to invasion by moisture seeping through concrete walls or up through subfloor materials. This is why it's vital to choose flooring that's specifically designed for below-grade use. If you want a finished basement that's attractive and functional, as well as one that won't require constant maintenance, opt for easy-care materials like those listed below. 

Epoxy

Epoxy flooring is a mixture of resin with hardeners added. And if you've ever shopped the local food warehouse or super home store, you've likely seen epoxy flooring. Sleek and exceptionally glossy, epoxy can be applied with rollers over the course of a single weekend, giving you an attractive basement floor that's nearly impervious to damage. It's available in a full range of colors, as well. 

Stamped, Stained or Painted Concrete

Another easy flooring option for your new basement involves concrete that's been poured and smoothed with a rake and a squeegee. Afterward, the concrete can be stained or painted any color you desire. It can even be stamped to resemble other materials such as natural stone, brick or tile. 

Laminate

Laminate is a type of flooring that's installed as planks or tiles. It's a manufactured type of flooring that's extremely durable and can mimic the look and feel of hardwood at a fraction of the cost and without the worry of warping should it happen to get wet. Because it's installed in pieces as a floating floor, laminate is easy to repair if a section becomes damaged. Simply pop out the bad plank and replace it with a new one. This may mean removing part of the floor to get to the piece that's damaged, but there's no adhesive involved with laminate, so putting everything back is an easy fix. 

Rubber

Rubber flooring comes in multiple variations, including tiles and rolls. Either is good for basement flooring, but tiles are easy to replace should the need arise. Rubber is super easy to install, and it adds soft comfort to your below-grade space. It's also a great insulator. This translates into a lower utility bill each month. Residential-grade rubber flooring may be comparable in price, however, to other high-end flooring options such as natural stone.  

These flooring options are all easy to install yourself, but if you doubt your DIY skills, your local contractor will be happy to help. Your newly finished basement can be a reality this year if you make savvy choices from the floor up. 

 




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Sonia Rollins on 8/2/2020

Photo by Analogicus via Pixabay

After settling into your home, you start to notice a few things either need to be retouched or completely overhauled. The biggest issue that a lot of homeowners run into is the money for the project. Even after assessing whether the project is a DIY or you’ll need a professional, funding still comes before action. Here are a few funding options to consider before you begin your home improvement projects.

Borrow from Your Future: 401(K)

A vast number of traditionally employed homeowners have a 401(K). Often, an employer will deposit funds into this account just as the employee does, but did you know you can borrow from it? If your housing project requires a little more than what you have in your savings account, try taking a little from your 401(K). Remember, even though it’s your account, it’s not free money. You will have to put it back once you’re able, and if you separate from your current company, you may run into a few extra fees if the money isn’t returned within five (5) years.

Government-Backed Improvement Loans

There are a few different types of government-backed loans that allow you to improve your home. You just need to identify the category your home improvement falls under. If you’re looking to do a few moderate improvements, try the 203K loan. These loans are great if you’ve purchased a preexisting home and have a few hefty renovations to cover. You can even add this loan to your mortgage payments.

If your home improvement project happens to fall more along the “greener” side of things, such as heating/cooling, water-efficient landscaping, energy reduction systems, etc., you may be able to apply for a PACE loan. These loans are pretty easy to get approval for, can often receive tax credits and may be sold to your next buyer when you decide to move.

Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC)

Have you been in your home for a while? Maybe a HELOC would be the best method for you to finance your home improvement projects. Since your home has accrued equity over the years, you’ll be able to secure the loan by using it as collateral. These loans are often suited for long renovations or projects that may require a few extra stages.

If your home improvement projects end up with a longer price tag than you were expecting, don’t fret. There are several other ways that you’ll be able to cover the cost, including tax credits and grants. If you’re prepping your home to sell in the near future, chat with your agent about the best renovations, improvements and repairs, as well as, how to fund them.






Tags: home improvement   loans   401K   Funding   Grants  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Sonia Rollins on 7/26/2020

Making your own candles is a fulfilling endeavor to take. You’ll learn about the art of candle-making, get the chance to make something for your home yourself, and reap the rewards once you get to burn it and diffuse whatever (if any) fragrances you choose to use.

Many people are surprised to learn that it isn’t all that hard to make a candle. However, to make one that will burn well and smell nice can be tricky.

In this article, we’re going to walk you through how to make your own candle for your home.

Chandlery

In the times when households weren’t yet powered by electricity, candle-making or “chandlery” wasn’t just a fun skill to have--it was downright useful.

Since the earliest times in recorded history humans have been making candles. First from tallow, or beef fat, and then of beeswax and other animal-produced substances.

Today, however, the most common candle wax base is paraffin, due to it being the cheapest base. As a petroleum byproduct, many people are concerned with potential health risks of paraffin and have elected to use alternatives. The two most common are beeswax and soybean oil.

The wax base you choose is up to you, but you’ll likely find that soy is a good middle ground between quality and price.

Gather your supplies

Once you’ve decided on a wax, you’ll need to think about a few other ingredients--namely your wick, container, and any oils you’d like to add for fragrance. You’ll also need a way to melt the wax, such as a double boiler.

When it comes to wicks, it’s easiest to buy them pre-assembled. However, you can buy a roll of braided rope and tabs to make and cut them yourself. When cutting your wick, leave an inch or two extra so that you can cut the wick to the proper size later on.

In terms of a container you have several options, some of which might be laying around in your house at this very moment. You could reuse an old candle container, use mason jars or coffee cups, and most other heat- and flame-resistant containers. If you plan on making several, buying a pack of candle tins of mason jars online is an economical way to go.

Finally, you’ll need to choose some fragrances if you want your candle to smell like anything. There are hundreds of essential oils to choose from. However, they don’t all go nicely together. It’s best to do a bit of research and find out which oils make good pairs. Some examples: Cedarwood and bergamot, lavender and rosemary, orange and lemongrass.

Making your candle

Put water in the bottom of your double boiler and add roughly ½ lb wax to the top pan. Heat slowly until the wax melts, stirring and chopping up the larger chunks throughout the process.

Once the wax is melted, take your wick and dip the tab into the wax, then carefully press the tab into the bottom of your container. Use a pen or other tool to do this to avoid burning yourself on the wax.

Next, add your essential oils to the double boiler. A pound of wax typically requires only an ounce of oil. Then, stir it for a minute or so to distribute the oil throughout the wax.

Then, pour the wax into your container with one hand. With your other hand, keep the wick held in the center of the container.

Finally, you’ll need to keep the wick in the center of the candle until the wax dries. You can do this by tying or taping the wick to a pen or pencil and resting the pencil on top of the container so that the wick stays in the center.




Tags: DIY   candles   fragrance  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Sonia Rollins on 7/22/2020

This Single-Family in Winchester, MA recently sold for $954,000. This Ranch style home was sold by Sonia Rollins - EXIT Premier Real Estate.


14 New Meadows Rd, Winchester, MA 01890

Single-Family

$859,000
Price
$954,000
Sale Price

7
Rooms
3
Beds
2
Baths
Want to downsize to single level living but not forfeit space? Looking for a home in a sought after neighborhood within walking distance of Nutile Fields and many other area amenities? How about a home that sits beautifully on its lot with so many great attributes already present yet giving you the ability to add on in order to make it just right for you? Any & all of these describe this beautiful 3BR, 2BA expanded ranch. The home boasts hardwood throughout, a spectacular living room with fireplace, formal dining with built-in, a spacious foyer as well as an oversized master suite with ample closet space & a private bath. The lower level is impressive with a finished family room and more than adequate storage space on the unfinished side. (you may want to finish that too!) The beautiful weather will allow you to either sit on your front porch or relax on your back patio that overlooks a level well kept yard.The home you've been waiting for has just come on the market.

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Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Sonia Rollins on 7/22/2020

This Single-Family in Bedford, MA recently sold for $1,185,000. This Colonial style home was sold by Sonia Rollins - EXIT Premier Real Estate.


35 Buehler Road, Bedford, MA 01730

Single-Family

$1,200,000
Price
$1,185,000
Sale Price

11
Rooms
4
Beds
3/1
Full/Half Baths
Welcome home to 35 Buehler Road, situated on a quiet cul-de-sac in the sought after Governor Winthrop Estates. Make this beautiful home yours and start creating your best memories. This gorgeous home has been lovingly maintained by its original owners and boasts four beautifully sized bedrooms, all with hardwood flooring, spacious and open family room, breakfast area and kitchen, with new quartz counters and tile backsplash, stunning front to back formal dining room and step down living room. This home boasts beautiful over-sized windows throughout. A private office on the first floor can also be used as a fifth bedroom, or playroom. Step outside into your beautiful backyard oasis, perfect for a life-time of family fun and laughter

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Categories: Sold Homes  




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